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Issues in 2019


THE FUNCTIONS OF INNER DIALOGUE WHILE DRIVING A CAR Print E-mail

Primož Rakovec[1]

Abstract

The purpose of our article is to research the functions of inner dialogue while driving a car. We assumed the following: (1) driver is aware of the inner dialogue; (2) inner dialogue affects driving style; and (3) negative inner dialogue increases aggressive driving of car drivers. To answer those questions, we describe various theories of inner dialogue and (aggressive) driving. Further, we connect and present inner dialogue and aggressive driving within the theoretical model of impact of inner dialogue on aggressive driving. Connectedness of inner dialogue and aggressive driving is also checked using qualitative research with a population sample of 29 Slovenian drivers. The results of the research show that drivers are aware of inner dialogue while driving, evaluative, self-directing and self-encouraging functions of inner dialogue are present while driving a car, that inner dialogue co-influences the emergence of aggressive driving, and inner dialogue of aggressive drivers is negative.

Key words: inner dialogue, driving style, aggressive driving, defensive driving, behaviour, road safety

[1] Primož Rakovec, assistant lecturer at School of Advanced Social Studies in Nova Gorica, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Cite this article:
Rakovec Primož. THE FUNCTIONS OF INNER DIALOGUE WHILE DRIVING A CAR. Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, vol.12, no.3:6-20, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art1

Digital Object Identifier(DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art1

View full text in pdf: http://www.iiass.com/pdf/IIASS-2019-no3-art1.pdf

 

 

 
FROM INDUSTRY 4.0 TO TOURISM 4.0 Print E-mail

Saša Zupan Korže [1]

Abstract

The fourth Industrial revolution has affected all disciplines, economies and industries. Technology, the key enabler for Industry 4.0, also has a tremendous influence on tourism. The purpose of the study is to explore how the concept of Industry 4.0 has been embraced by tourism. Even though academics have paid an increased attention to the concept of Industry 4.0 in the last few years, the scholarly research on Tourism 4.0 remains at a preliminary stage. This is an exploratory type of paper with a descriptive presentation of results. Data were collected from secondary sources and processed by using the method of content analysis. Findings reveal, firstly, different use of the term Tourism 4.0 among governments, tourism policy makers, practitioners and scholars; secondly, tourism stakeholders have already widely implemented the technologies of the fourth industrial revolution that are suitable for designing tourism services. The study supports the Tourism 4.0 to become a global paradigm and contributes to the body of literature on technological changes in tourism.

Keywords: Industry 4.0, Tourism 4.0, technology, new paradigm

[1] Saša Zupan Korže, Ph.D., assistant professor, is a lecturer (of law, tourism, economics, entrepreneurship), researcher and consultant.
 

Cite this article:
Korže  Saša Zupan. FROM INDUSTRY 4.0 TO TOURISM 4.0. Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, vol.12, no.3:29-52, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art3

Digital Object Identifier(DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art3

View full text in pdf: http://www.iiass.com/pdf/IIASS-2019-no3-art3.pdf

 
DECOUPLING DISCOURSES OF CULTURE, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT: PRAGMATIC REFLECTIONS FROM ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY PERSPECTIVES Print E-mail

Forzo Titang Franklin[1], Thebe Philip[2]

Abstract

The elaboration of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) as a road map for promoting development and alleviating poverty has unabatedly necessitated the incorporation of gender and culturally inclined development frameworks in interpreting and implementing development aid interventions in developing countries. However understanding “effective” sustainable development processes still proves problematic given the wavering dynamics of cultural processes in economic development. This essay examines the nuanced intersection between culture, gender and development as embedded in economic anthropology discourses. It further explores the economic/culture nexus that challenges contemporary sustainable development debates, by examining the underlying epistemological and theoretical paradigms of culture, gender and the economy as a process that shapes economic behaviours and inherently influences the social and economic structure of varying rural communities and societies. We argue that the social relationships that underscore the socio-cultural embeddedness of economic resources such as land and their access thereof, inadvertently fosters power relations that deepens gender disparities in economic development and stagnates conventional rights based approaches to local development. The essay concludes on the need to critically reorientate development thinking and knowledge that will attenuate a common ground for a “rights” based approach to development, and bridge the culture and gender nexus within economic development.

Keywords: culture; development; economic anthropology; societies; gender; economy

[1]Forzo Titang Franklin, Research Graduate, Cultural Anthropology & Development Studies, KU Leuven, Belgium. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Corresponding Author)
 

[2] Thebe Philip, PhD Fellow, Anthropology, Research &Teaching Assistant, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Cite this article:
Franklin Forzo Titang, Thebe Philip. DECOUPLING DISCOURSES OF CULTURE, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT: PRAGMATIC REFLECTIONS FROM ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY PERSPECTIVES. Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, vol.12, no.3:21-28, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art2

Digital Object Identifier(DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art2

View full text in pdf: http://www.iiass.com/pdf/IIASS-2019-no3-art2.pdf

 

 

 
PEOPLE’S PERCEPTIONS AND PRACTICES OF DOMESTIC ADOPTION IN ADAMA CITY Print E-mail

Heran Ejara[1], Nega Jibat[2]

Abstract

Adoption is a childcare and protection measure that enables an unaccompanied child to benefit from a substitute and permanent family care; it can be either domestic or inter-country. This study examined perceptions and practices of domestic adoption in Adama City in Oromia/Ethiopia. Interviews and document review were used in gathering information. Six (6) adoptive parents and thirteen (13) other community members participated in in-depth interviews and six (6) key informant interviews were made with staffs of three adoption agencies. Narrative analysis technique was employed. The study reveals that people’s perception towards adoption practice, adoptive parents and children is mixed; it could be positive and encouraging or negative and discouraging. Personal, religious and moral reasons are major sources of justification for those who adopt children whereas few of them centrally focus on meeting needs and interests of the child. Fear of property inheritance by the adoptive child in the future is the most important factor for people who refrain from adopting children. Banning inter-country adoption by the government of Ethiopia as of January 2018 while there are sizable children in need of substitute and permanent family care proves the necessity of cultivating domestic adoption practices and revitalizing Guddifachaa which is customary alternative childcare practice originated among the Oromo and widely accepted across the country.

Kewords: Domestic adoption, Guddifachaa, Adoptive parents, Adoptive children, Adama

[1] Heran Ejara, is a lecturer of Sociology at Jimma University, Ethiopia. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  
 

[2] Nega Jibat is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Jimma University, Ethiopia. e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Cite this article:
Ejara Heran, Jibat Nega. PEOPLE’S PERCEPTIONS AND PRACTICES OF DOMESTIC ADOPTION IN ADAMA CITY. Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, vol.12, no.3:53-73, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art4

Digital Object Identifier(DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art4

View full text in pdf: http://www.iiass.com/pdf/IIASS-2019-no3-art4.pdf

 

 
WORK REORGANISATION AND THE CONSTRAINTS OF STANDARD LABOUR PRACTICES IN NIGERIAN FOOD AND BEVERAGE SECTOR Print E-mail

Jubril Olayiwola Jawando[1], Adebimpe Adenugba[2]

Abstract

Globalization has continued to impose constraints on the ability of nation-states to control and regulate labour and working conditions effectively. In spite of the rigorous labour law system in Nigeria, the ideological hegemony of neo-liberalism has weakened the political will to regulate employment conditions and labour rights successfully. The growth in the number of multinational corporations has heightened insecurity and vulnerability for those workers employed by subcontractors. Relying on neo-liberal theory as it theoretical leaning, the paper examined work reorganisation and the constraints of standard labour practices in Nigerian Food and Beverage Sector. A total of 550 permanent and non-permanent workers were proportionately selected. Also, a total of 18 In-depth interviews were conducted among management, senior, junior staff, non-permanent workers and Trade union leaders across the sub-sectors. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and multivariate statistics, while qualitative data were content analysed. The study found that casualisation did not encourage best labour practices in the food and beverage industry. Casualisation and outsourcing affected workers’ right to pension and gratuity benefits of non-permanent workers than permanent workers in both sectors. There was significant relationship between work reorganisation[r=0.29, df (224): P<.01] and decent work treatment of non-permanent staff in the beverage sub-sector Therefore, stakeholders should put effective monitoring mechanisms in place to enhance best labour practices in food and beverage industry.

Keywords: Work Reorganisation, Decent work, Job outsourcing, Casualisation, inhuman Treatment

[1] Jubril Olayiwola Jawando PhD   is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Lagos State University, Nigeria, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

[2] Adebimpe Adenugba PhD  is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan Oyo State Nigeria ), This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Cite this article:
Jawando Jubril Olayiwola, Adenugba Adebimpe. WORK REORGANISATION AND THE CONSTRAINTS OF STANDARD LABOUR PRACTICES IN NIGERIAN FOOD AND BEVERAGE SECTOR. Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, vol.12, no.3:74-95, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art5

Digital Object Identifier(DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.12959/issn.1855-0541.IIASS-2019-no3-art5

View full text in pdf: http://www.iiass.com/pdf/IIASS-2019-no3-art5.pdf

 

 

 

 
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